About

SHEG is a collaboration among many people: full-time staff, graduate student RAs, practicing teachers, and undergraduate volunteers and interns. SHEG sponsors an ongoing research group for students across the university interested in issues of how history is taught and learned. We also host visiting scholars whose work addresses issues of historical understanding and history education.

Staff

Joel Breakstone

breakstone@stanford.edu

Joel Breakstone directs the Stanford History Education Group. He received his Ph.D. from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2013. Along with Mark Smith and Sam Wineburg, he led the development of SHEG's assessment website, Beyond the Bubble. He holds a B.A. in history from Brown University and a M.A. in Liberal Studies from Dartmouth College. After graduating college, he taught high school history in Thetford, Vermont, for six years. His research focuses on how teachers use assessment data to inform instruction.


Mark Smith co-directs the Teaching with Primary Sources program at Stanford. Along with colleagues Joel Breakstone and Sam Wineburg, he led the development of SHEG's assessment website, Beyond the Bubble. He received a Ph.D. from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2014 and also holds a M.A.T. in secondary social studies education from the University of Iowa and a B.A. in history and political science from the University of Northern Iowa. In addition to his work with SHEG, Mark teaches history, social science, and government courses at the Castilleja School in Palo Alto, California. Previously, he taught high school history and government in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and history and psychology in Plano, Texas. His research is focused on K-12 history assessment, particularly on issues of validity and generalizability.


Brad Fogo

bfogo@stanford.edu

Brad Fogo is the Director of Curriculum Development for the Stanford History Education Group and is currently leading the development of world history materials. He also works as a Clinical Research Associate for history education at the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching (CSET). A public school history teacher for nine years, he holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Teacher Education from Stanford. He has been involved in the research and development of several SHEG projects and has worked with teachers throughout the country with the Reading Like A Historian curriculum. His B.A. in history is from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he holds an M.A. in history from the University of Montana. His dissertation, a history of the California history standards, was awarded the Outstanding Dissertation Prize for 2010 from Phi Delta Kappa, the national honor society in education.


Sarah McGrew

smcgrew@stanford.edu

Sarah McGrew teaches in the Stanford Teacher Education Program and develops curriculum materials for the Stanford History Education Group. She grew up in Michigan and earned a B.A. in Political Science and Education from Swarthmore College before completing the Stanford Teacher Education Program. After STEP, she taught world history in Washington, D.C., for five years. Sarah is now a doctoral student in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. In her free time, she enjoys swimming, baking, and exploring the West Coast.


Teresa Ortega

teortega@stanford.edu

Teresa Ortega is SHEG's project manager and divides her time among administrative tasks, communications, and contributing to curricula. She graduated from Stanford University in 2012 with a B.A. in history in the major's public history and public service track. She's interested in women of color histories and in how public history is used as a tool for community building and identity construction. She enjoys comics, tacos, and gardening.


Sam Wineburg

wineburg@stanford.edu

Sam Wineburg, the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education and of History (by courtesy), is the founder and Executive Director of the Stanford History Education Group and Stanford's Ph.D. program in History Education. He also oversees the M.A. program for future history teachers. His scholarship has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post, USA Today, the New Yorker, and on NPR and C-SPAN. In 2003 his book, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past, received the Frederic W. Ness Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities for the most important contribution to "improvement of Liberal Education and understanding the Liberal Arts." In 2007 he was awarded the American Historical Association's William Gilbert Prize for distinguished scholarship on the teaching of history as well as being named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians. In his spare moments, he puts on a toolbelt and refurbishes old houses.

 

Ph.D. Students

Tadashi Dozono

tadashi@berkeley.edu

Tadashi Dozono earned a B.A. in American Studies from Wesleyan University, and an M.A. in Secondary Social Studies from Columbia's Teachers College. He went on to help establish a small public school in the Lower East Side, where he taught and headed the social studies department for seven years. Tadashi is currently a Ph.D. student in UC Berkeley’s Social and Cultural Studies program in the Graduate School of Education. He is interested in issues of historiography, meta-narrative development, and identity in world history classrooms. Tadashi enjoys running, playing outside with friends, learning languages, and spending time with family.


Jonah Hassenfeld

jonah.hassenfeld@gmail.com

Jonah Hassenfeld is a Ph.D. student in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education interested in the high school history classroom as a site for identity development. After receiving his B.A. in Philosophy from Columbia University, Jonah taught middle school English for one year in New York City. He then taught European History and Philosophy for four years at a high school in Waltham, Massachusetts.


Brian Johnsud

johnsrud@stanford.edu

Brian Johnsrud researches the cultural memory of violence between the U.S. and the Middle East, especially how historical analogies and metaphors have been used to frame contemporary violence between these regions. He studied at Montana State and Oxford, and holds masters degrees in media science, medieval literature, and cultural anthropology. He is currently a Ph.D. student in Stanford's interdisciplinary Modern Thought and Literature program, where his research methods and interests include ethnography, media and cultural studies, and literary analysis. He conducts fieldwork in Lebanon every year. Personal Website: http://www.stanford.edu/~johnsrud


Harper B. Keenan

hkeenan@stanford.edu

Harper B. Keenan holds a B.A. in Social & Historical Inquiry from Eugene Lang College at The New School and an M.S. in Childhood Special and General Education from Bank Street College. He taught in elementary special education inclusion classrooms in Brooklyn. His research interests are in elementary teacher education and developing elementary history/social studies curriculum that fosters critical literacy. He loves hiking, camping, and all things outdoors.


Adam Nilsen

anilsen@stanford.edu

Adam Nilsen is a Ph.D. candidate in Developmental and Psychological Sciences. Adam studies how people connect to stories of others through empathy and perspective taking. His background is in museum education -- as a researcher at the Oakland Museum of California, he has curated exhibits on migrant labor history, LGBT communities past and present, and community members' recollections of the 1960s and 1970s. He holds a B.A. from Stanford and an M.A. from New York University. Other interests include vegan culinary experimentation and long urban walks.


Maribel Santiago

maribels@stanford.edu

Maribel Santiago is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford's Graduate School of Education. Her dissertation research focuses on how Mexican American history comes to be a part of curriculum, and what its inclusion tells us about popular conceptions of Mexican Americans. Prior to Stanford, she taught social studies in Watts, where she created community-based lesson plans that encouraged high school students to learn about and work within their neighborhoods. Maribel holds B.A.s in History and Chicana/o Studies and a M.Ed from UCLA, as well as a M.A. in History from Stanford. She is a Stanford El Centro Chicano Graduate Scholar-in-Residence, a DARE (Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence) Fellow, and a former Center for Comparative Studies on Race and Ethnicity Fellow. Maribel's article, “Teaching a New Chapter of History” appeared in the March 2013 Phi Delta Kappan.

 

Postdocs

Erik Sjöberg is a research fellow at Umeå University, Sweden, and a postdoctoral fellow with SHEG. He completed his Ph.D. in 2011. His dissertation Battlefields of Memory: the Macedonian Conflict and Greek Historical Culture explored the controversy between Greece and the Republic of Macedonia in the 1990s over the right to use historical symbols. His current project, funded by the Swedish Research Council, analyzes the politics of memory surrounding what is sometimes referred to as the genocide of the Ottoman Greeks. Originally trained as a high school history teacher, he has also taught history and Modern Greek at the universities of Umeå, Gothenburg and Lund.


Thomas Nygren

tnygren@stanford.edu

Thomas Nygren is a postdoctoral fellow in Digital Humanities at Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. In collaboration with SHEG, he is studying Human Rights Education in Sweden and the United States. In Sweden, he is Senior Lecturer in Education in the Department of Education, Uppsala University, and a researcher at HUMlab, Umeå University.

 

SHEG Affiliates

Jonathan Burack

mjbkburack@att.net

Jonathan Burack earned his B.A. in history and economics from Harvard, a M.A.T. from the Harvard's School of Education, and did graduate work in the history of education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He taught high school history for several years. In 1984, Jonathan began work as Editor-in-Chief of Newscurrents, a weekly current-events program for schools. Since 1995, he has been the author of MindSparks, a curriculum series that teaches students to interpret primary sources, write DBQ essays, and master strategies that foster sound habits of historical thought. In his spare time, he is a long-distance runner who struggles to become a blues and bluegrass guitar player. 


Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley. He received a B.A. from Columbia University and then traveled to England on a Marshall Scholarship to study history at King's College, Cambridge. He has taught college courses at Berkeley and at San Quentin State Prison. His dissertation examined U.S. attempts to develop the Third World after WWII. He joined the history department at Northwestern University in 2012. His article, "The Fact/Narrative Distinction and Student Examinations in History,” appeared in The History Teacher, 41 (2008).


Daisy Martin

daisyamartin@gmail.com

Daisy Martin earned her Ph.D. in curriculum and teacher education in history/social science from Stanford University, her M.A. in education from UC Berkeley, and her B.A. in history and philosophy from the University of Michigan. A founding member of the Stanford History Education Group, Daisy has been a history teacher and teacher educator. She has led professional development workshops for the National Parks Service, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project, and Stanford's Summer Teaching Institute. She lives in Santa Cruz with her husband, two daughters, and two cats, and is currently trying to establish a running routine.

Selected publications:

1. “Seeing Thinking on the Web.” 
2. “Tampering with History, Adapting Primary Sources for Struggling Readers.” 
3. “From Lecture to Lesson Through Opening Up the Textbook.” 


Chauncey Monte-Sano

cmontesa@umich.edu

Chauncey Monte-Sano is an associate professor of history and social studies education at the University of Michigan. She holds a B.A. in American Studies from Yale and a Ph.D. from Stanford, where she was the first graduate of the re-constituted Ph.D. program in History Education. With Daisy Martin and Sam Wineburg, Chauncey was a founding member of the Stanford History Education Group. Her 2007 dissertation won the Larry Metcalf Award from the National Council of the Social Studies. Her scholarship has appeared in the Journal of American History, the American Educational Research Journal, Theory and Research in Social Education, Phi Delta Kappan, Journal of Learning Sciences, and Curriculum Inquiry.


Abby Reisman

areisman@gse.upenn.edu

Abby Reisman is an Assistant Professor of Teacher Education at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. She was formerly a visiting assistant professor at Teachers College, Columbia University and before that an Analyst at the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, Student Testing (CRESST) at UCLA. She was the Project Director for "Reading Like a Historian" in San Francisco, the first extended history curriculum intervention in urban high schools. Her 2011 dissertation won the Larry Metcalf Award from the National Council of the Social Studies, and an article that emerged from this dissertation won the 2013 William Gilbert Award from the American Historical Association. She holds a B.A. in history from Brown University and taught high school humanities at the Institute for Collaborative Education in New York City. Her work has appeared in Cognition and Instruction (2012), the Journal of Curriculum Studies (2012), and is forthcoming in Teachers College Record.


Chava Shane-Sagiv

chavas@mli.org.il

Chava Shane-Sagiv earned both a B.A. and M.A. in history from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She taught high school history and has been involved in research and development of educational initiatives in Israel. Chava is interested in the cognitive and social processes that influence the learning of history, and the relationship between academic learning and identity building. Her doctoral dissertation, completed at the Hebrew University in December 2011, focused on how Israeli high school students make sense of national and world history. She currently acts as the director of the IDF Educational Leadership Development Program at the Mandel Leadership Institute in Jerusalem.


Valerie Ziegler

valerieziegler@gmail.com

Valerie Ziegler teaches U.S. history, economics, and AP U.S. politics and government at Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco. She served for three years as the chair of the social studies department and is currently a team teacher in the Teacher and Green Academies. She received a B.S. in Business Administration from Indiana University and a M.A. in Education Technology from the University of San Francisco. In 2008, she piloted the first version of the Reading Like a Historian curriculum and continues to be involved in the development process for new curriculum and assessments. She has also led efforts to provide professional development for other SFUSD teachers in using the RLH approach. In 2010, she was named one of five California Teachers of the Year and the Gilder Lehrman California History Teacher of the Year.

 

Teacher Fellows for 2014-2015

Riley Haggin is an 8th-grade U.S. History at Egan Junior High School in Los Altos, California. Riley grew up in the East Bay and earned a B.A. in History, with an emphasis in Early Modern Europe, from the College of William and Mary in 2004. After graduating college, she taught history and math at Mother Caroline Academy in Dorchester, Massachusetts, where she discovered her love of teaching. She moved back to California to earn her teaching credential and M.Ed. from Stanford in 2008. When she is not teaching, Riley loves traveling, exploring San Francisco, cheering on the Stanford Cardinal and spending time with her family and friends. She contributed to the world history curriculum during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years.


Kevin Heiken

kevinheiken@gmail.com

Kevin Heiken graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in History and a minor in Urban Education. While working towards his Ph.D. in Ancient History, Kevin discovered his love for teaching and mentoring high school students and changed paths. Since completing his M.A. at Stanford, Kevin has taught World Studies and U.S. history at Mountain View High School. He also helps with the after-school homework club and serves on the Leadership Team. Kevin’s interests include baseball, fishing, surfing, and brewing.

 

Visiting Scholars

Björn Astrand

bjorn.astrand@use.umu.se

Björn Åstrand served from 2005-2011 as dean for Umeå School of Education at Umeå University, Sweden. After undergraduate studies at Uppsala University, he returned to northern Sweden to teach secondary school and to pursue doctoral work in history. His Ph.D. thesis, Torture and Painful Inquisition — Violence and Force in Late Medieval and Early Modern Swedish Jurisdiction, questioned one of the grand narratives of Swedish history through its combined use of traditional history together with legal history and history of ideas. More recently, Professor Åstrand turned his attention to teacher education. In 2007, he was appointed as expert to the Swedish government’s efforts to create a new model for teacher preparation. He has also chaired the European Network on Teacher Education Policy.


Yifat Ben-David Kolikant

yifatbdk@mscc.huji.ac.il

Yifat Ben-David Kolikant is associate professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, School of Education. She earned her Ph.D. at the Weizmann Institute of Science. She studies the interrelations among technology, schooling, and learning. Two current research projects include: "Teachers and Students: Two Learning Cultures?," studying the impact of students’ computer and Internet technology on their history classes, and "Doing History Together," where Israeli Jewish and Arab students collaborate in a Web-based environment to investigate their shared past of conflict. She enjoys hiking, theatre, and reading.

Selected publications:

1.  Ben-David Kolikant, Y. (2009). Digital students in a book-oriented school: Students’ perceptions of school and the usability of digital technology in schools, Educational Technology & Society, 12(2), 131–143 

2.  Ben-David Kolikant, Y. & Pollack, S. (2009).  The asymmetrical influence of identity: a triadic interaction among Israeli Jews, Israeli Arabs, and historical texts, Journal of Curriculum Studies, 41(5), 651-677. 


Mario Carretero

mario.carretero@mac.com

Mario Carretero is Professor at the Autonomous University of Madrid, and Researcher at FLACSO (Argentina), where he coordinates the M.A. Program in Cognitive Psychology & Learning. He earned his Ph.D. at Cumplutense University, Madrid, and he conducted postdoctoral research at Teachers College-Columbia University and LRDC of the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on the relationship between identity construction and history education. His newest book, Constructing Patriotism: Teaching History and Memories in Global Worlds (Information Age Publishing, 2011), has also been published in Spanish, Portuguese and French.

Selected Publications:

Carretero, M., & Bermudez, A. (In press).  Constructing histories.  In J. Valsiner (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Culture and Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Voss, J.F., & Carretero, M. (2000) (Eds.) International Review on History Education. Vol 2. Learning and reasoning in history. London: Taylor and Francis. Translated into Spanish, Buenos Aires, Amorrortu, 2004.


Jocelyn Létourneau holds the Canada Research Chair in contemporary Quebec History at Laval University, Quebec City. He is a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J., a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a fellow of the Trudeau Foundation, with degrees from Laval University and the University of Toronto. He studies the development of historical consciousness in youth, the politics of history, and the relations between memory and identity. As a Fulbright Fellow at Stanford, his focus was Young Quebecers and Their History of Quebec: Relationship with the Past and Historical Consciousness. Among his publications (most of which appear in French) are A History for the Future: Rewriting Memory and Identity in Quebec (McGill-Queen's U. Press, 2004); "Young people's assimilation of a collective historical memory," with Sabrina Moisan, in Peter Seixas (ed.), Theorizing Historical Consciousness (Toronto, UTP, 2004) "Canadians and their pasts: An Exploration in historical consciousness," with Margaret Conrad and David Northrup, The Public Historian, 31(1)  (Feb. 2009).


Matthias Martens is a postdoctoral fellow in the interdisciplinary research group Successful Matching of School Learning: Understanding and Optimization, a graduate program funded by the German Research Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. in history education from Georg-August University in Göttingen, Germany. His research focuses on students’ historical understanding, particularly their ability to navigate conflicting historical accounts and interpretations. He enjoys jogging, cooking, reading, and traveling.


Sabine Moller is a Professor of History Education at Flensburg University. She studies aspects of historical consciousness such as family recollections, historical feature films, and politics of memory. A Fellow of the German Research Foundation (DFG), she served as a visiting scholar at Stanford between 2007-2009 examining the interrelationship between historical feature films and viewers’ historical consciousness. She earned her Ph.D. (a comparison of East and West German memories of World War II) in social sciences from the University of Hanover. From 2002-2005, she was coordinator of the Traditions of Historical Consciousness Project, located at the Center for Interdisciplinary Memory Research. Her pastimes include biking through Europe and visiting American parks. Sabine maintains a personal homepage

Selected publications:

1. Review of published Ph.D. thesis.


Svetlana Suveica

ssuveica@yahoo.com

Svetlana Suveica is an Associate Professor at the Department of History and Philosophy of Moldova State University in Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. She is a former Fulbright researcher at CREEES/Stanford (2009/2010). Her research focuses on the political and social transformations of the interwar Romania and Eastern Europe, comparative methodology, as well as teaching and learning in Moldovan higher education. Her research has explored how students learn to make historical comparisons. In December 2012 she began a Humboldt senior research fellowship in residence at the Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS) in Regensburg, Germany, where she will write a book on alternative visions of belonging of Bessarabians after WWI.


Laura Valledor

lsvalled@uc.cl

Dr. Laura Valledor is assistant professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile School of Education, where she heads the MA program in education. She earned her BA in history and teacher education and her doctorate in education, all from the Pontifical Catholic University. Her research focuses on the relationship between adolescents’ comprehension of historical time and their social background. Laura has also organized collaborations between historians and school teachers on how to foster historical thinking among their students. Laura was in residence at Stanford in Summer 2013, working on the design of a new MA program on teaching history and social sciences. Laura enjoys spending quality time with her family.

 

Recent Graduates

Mike Dunson

mdunson@stanford.edu

Michael Dunson is currently an assistant principal at City Arts and Technology High School in San Francisco, and he is working towards his administrative credential in the Principal Leadership Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. Mike earned a Ph.D. at the Stanford University School of Education and a Master of Arts in history education at Columbia University, Teachers College. His research interests include the history of educational politics and the decision-making processes involved in educational policy.


Magdalena Gross

mgross1@stanford.edu

Magdalena H. Gross is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Stanford Program in Writing and Rhetoric. She completed her Ph.D. from the Stanford University Graduate School of Education in 2014. She holds B.A. from the University of Chicago and an M.A. in teaching from Dominican University. She taught eighth grade history on Chicago's South Side for two years, and later became a teacher coach and program director for Teach for America. Magda is interested in the intersection between historical memory and the history curriculum in Poland. In her free time, Magda enjoys running and painting urban arts murals.


Julie Haubner

haubner@stanford.edu

Julie Haubner earned an A.B. in Classics and an Ed.M. in Language and Literacy from Harvard. She is a National Board Certified Teacher in English Language Arts. For six years Julie was a middle school humanities teacher and literacy specialist in Massachusettes, California, and Washington. She was a National Academy of Education Predoctoral Adolescent Literacy Fellow. Her dissertation, "Taking the 'History' out of Historical Thinking to Teach Adolescents to Evaluation Informational Text" was completed in Winter 2014. She currently lives in Los Angeles.


Jolie Matthews

joliem1@stanford.edu

Jolie Matthews is an Assistant Professor of Learning Sciences at Northwestern University. She received her Ph.D. from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2014, her Master of Professional Writing degree from USC, and her B.A. magna cum laude from New York University. Her focus is exploring the ways popular culture and new media technology shape historical consciousness, as well as how creative projects and online communities can enhance critical thinking in the classroom. She has interned at Showtime Networks, the Penguin Group, and Carol Mann Literacy Agency. She loves speculative fiction, classical music, and good movies.


Celine Oon earned a B.A. in history from the National University of Singapore and an M.A. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education from Stanford. She began her teaching career as a high school history teacher, where she taught for six years and headed the Leadership and Student Development department. Currently, she is a curriculum-planning officer in Singapore’s Ministry of Education. Celine is interested in students’ development of historical understanding and the role of inquiry and assessment in this process.


Rob Lucas is an assistant professor at the College of Education at East Carolina University. He holds a B.A. in Social Studies and an M.Ed. in educational technology from Harvard and a Ph.D. in education from Stanford. Previously, he taught middle school social studies in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. He is interested in online teacher knowledge sharing, Open Educational Resources, and local history in the secondary classroom.  He plays tennis and piano and is trying to learn the blues.

Selected publications:

1. "Open Access to E-Research."


Jack Schneider

jackschneider@gmail.com

Jack is currently an assistant professor at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.  He holds an M.A. in History and a Ph.D. in Education from Stanford University, as well as a B.A. in Political Science from Haverford College.  He is a former high school teacher, having worked with students in and around Philadelphia, and is also the founder of University Paideia—a pre-college program for underserved students in the San Francisco Bay Area.  His research focuses on educational policymaking and school reform in the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on efforts to promote equity. His most recent article, "Memory Test: A History of U.S. Citizenship Education and Examination," appears in Teachers College Record. His book, Excellence for All: How a New Breed of Reformers is Transforming America's Schools, was published by Vanderbilt University Press.


Eric H. Shed received his Ph.D. in History Education in 2013 and is now the Director of Teacher Preparation in History/Social Studies at Brown University.  He holds a B.A. in history from Wesleyan University. He taught high school social studies for eight years in New York City, where he was a methods instructor at New York University and worked with several City University of New York programs. At Stanford, he examined the role of media in history education, and in 2011 Eric was named a Stanford DARE (Diversifying Academia/Recruiting Excellence) fellow.


Luke Terra

lterra@stanford.edu

Luke Terra is the Director of Community Engaged Learning for the Center for Teaching and Learning of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. from the Stanford University Graduate School of Education as well as a B.A. in history and a teaching license in secondary social studies from Colorado College. He taught high school world and U.S. history in Colorado Springs. Luke managed programs at the Center for Civic Education in Calabasas, California before returning to Stanford to begin his doctoral studies. He is interested in comparative civics and history instruction, particularly post-conflict societies and transitioning democracies. Luke enjoys cooking with his son and playing Frisbee with his daughter.

Selected publications:

1. “New Histories for a New State: A Study of History Textbook Content in Northern Ireland.”


Sivan Zakai

szakai@ajula.edu

Sivan Zakai received her Ph.D. in curriculum and teacher education and an M.A. in history from Stanford in 2009. She holds a B.A. with high honors from the department of Government and College of Letters at Wesleyan University. She taught middle school social studies in Boston and high school history in Palo Alto. Based on her interests in history education and adolescent cultural and religious identity, her dissertation focused on the teaching of U.S. and Israeli history at Jewish schools in the U.S. She is currently teaching at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles.  She enjoys singing, swimming, and building train sets with her children. She is the author of "Values in Tension: Israel Education at a U.S. Jewish Day School," Journal of Jewish Education, 77(3), 239-265.

 

 

 

Dana Mejías
Teacher
San Diego, CA
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I am a middle school teacher in San Diego and was fortunate enough to a SHEG workshop in 2008....
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A huge thank you to the Stanford History Education Group!  Your incredible work and stimulating...
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I can't recall how or when I stumbled upon Reading Like a Historian, but it was a...

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I came across your site while researching to update and improve my U.S. History classes. I was...

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